GOVOLOGYWe are excited to bring you another webinar that we are hosting with Govology and presented by Maria Panichelli! We are happy to provide friends of Cohen Seglias a 25% discount off of this webinar when they register using the code protest25. This is a live webinar that includes on demand recordings that you will be able to access even if you cannot make the scheduled time. We think you will find this webinar to be not only informative but also a useful tool! Continue Reading Everything You Need to Know About Protests: Govology Webinar

On March 9th, 2016, join Maria Panichelli and Amy Kirby for their two seminars, “The Fundamentals of the Far Part 1, 2 and 3,” and “Debriefings, Bid Protests and Size Status Eligibility,”as part of the Procurement Technical Assistance Center of Delaware‘s (PTAC) two part seminar event, Two Seminars on the Same Day, One Price.

For more information on these seminars, please click here.

Continue Reading Procurement Technical Assistance Center of Delaware: Two Seminars on the Same Day

Ed DeLisle will present his seminar, “Navigating the Protest and Claims Processes as a Small Business,” on February 9th at the National 8(a) Association 2016 Winter Conference in Orlando, FL.

The conference is a two day event held on February 9th and 10th and will focus on federal and legal updates and how to navigate the ever-changing world of federal contracting. The nation’s top legal firms and the industry’s best consultants will be there to help 8(a) certified and non-8(a) certified businesses gain the valuable education, promotion, and federal contracting information they need to further advance their level of experience and achieve a higher degree of success.

For more information, and to register for the National 8(a) Association Winter Conference, please click here.

Edward T. DeLisle is Co-Chair of the Federal Contracting Practice Group. Ed frequently advises contractors on federal contracting matters including bid protests, claims and appeals, procurement issues, small business issues and dispute resolution.

The Government Accountability Office (“GAO”) issues statistics each year regarding the outcome of bid protests.  In 2015, there were 2,639 cases filed and there we 587 decisions on the merits.  Of those, only 68 protests were sustained.  According to the way the GAO presents its statistics, that would indicate that protestors prevailed approximately 12% of the time.  In reality, since many protests were withdrawn or summarily dismissed, the protesters only prevailed in 68 of the 2,639 protests filed and the true success rate was closer to 3%.  With those odds, why would anyone file a GAO bid protest?  The answer requires a little closer scrutiny since statistics can be misleading.

Continue Reading Deciding Whether to File a GAO Bid Protest

Please join us on NoveNVSBE logomber 18th and 19th for Maria Panichelli’s three seminars at the 2015 National Veterans Small Business Engagement in Pittsburgh, PA. To view the dates and times of Maria’s seminars, and to register, visit the NVSBE website Continue Reading The 2015 National Veterans Small Business Engagement

Please joinContractor's Agreement us for Maria Panichelli and Amy Kirby‘s seminar, “Avoiding Common Pitfalls in Small Business Government Contracting,” for the District of Columbia Procurement Technical Assistance Center (DC PTAC) on November 5th in Washington, D.C.  Continue Reading Avoiding Common Pitfalls in Small Business Government Contracting

Join EBidd DeLisle and Maria Panichelli for their presentation for TargetGov and the Government Contracting Institute on November 2, 2015 in Linthicum Heights, MD. Continue Reading Bid Protests, and Size/Status Eligibility Challenges: In-Depth Look at the Most Important Processes in Government Contracting

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Please join us for Maria Panichelli‘s webinar for Govology on October 29, 2015 at 1:00PM EST.

In today’s extremely competitive federal contracting market, understanding bid protests and the procedures relating to protests can make the difference between getting the contract, or getting left out of the race altogether.  Continue Reading Debriefing, Bid Protests, and Size & Status Investigations

In a bid protest argued by our firm before the United States Court of Federal Claims on September 23, 2014, the Court ruled in favor of our client, RLB Contracting, Inc., (RLB) in a matter involving the designation of the dredging exception to NAICS code 237990, which is for “Other Heavy and Civil Engineering Construction.” 13 C.F.R. § 121.201 (2014). The solicitation for the “South Lake Lery Shoreline Protection and Marsh Creation Project” was set aside for small business concerns by the Natural Resource Conservation Service, but the exception to NAICS code 237990 that applies when a project is considered to be dredging was not invoked. At the time, the exception lowered the small business size standard from $33.5 million to $25.5 million for dredging and required that the successful contractor “must perform at least 40 percent of the volume dredged with its own equipment or equipment owned by another small dredging concern.” 13 C.F.R. § 121.201, Footnote 2. (Currently, the applicable small business size standards are $36.5 million and $27.5 million respectively).

Dredging

The small business regulation found at 13 C.F.R. 121.402(b)(2) states that “[a] procurement is usually classified according to the component which accounts for the greatest percentage of contract value.” In this case, RLB presented evidence that the agency had internally estimated that over 50% of the work involved dredging and that the agency had made its NAICS code designation based on an erroneous calculation that only 10% of the work involved dredging. RLB first appealed the NAICS code designation to SBA’s Office of Hearings and Appeals (“OHA”), arguing that the agency applied the incorrect NAICS code size standard. OHA denied the appeal on the basis that the project included other items of work in addition to dredging. However, OHA did no analysis as to the contract value or relative importance of those “other items.” RLB then brought its protest to the United States Court of Federal Claims, again arguing that the agency violated the regulations by failing to apply the dredging exception. RLB also argued that the agency had failed to provide correct information to OHA, and that OHA had refused to consider supplemental information furnished by counsel for RLB. The Court ruled that OHA’s decision was incorrect as a matter of law because OHA’s “decision does not give primary consideration” to “the relative value and importance of the components of the procurement” and did not concern itself with whether the agency classified the procurement “according to the component [of work] which accounts for the greatest percentage of contract value.” 13 C.F.R. § 121.402(b)(1)-(b)(2) (2014).

The Court was critical of the agency for not including pertinent documents in the Administrative Record which demonstrated that the agency knew that the dredging work accounted for the greatest percentage of contract value, and was further critical of OHA for concluding that other, relatively minor, elements of the work supported the agency’s contention that the project did not predominantly involve dredging. As a result, the Court entered a permanent injunction and remanded the matter to the Contracting Officer with instructions “to make a new determination of whether the dredging exception applies based on all available current information.” The Court further stated that “If item 7, Excavation Marsh Creation Dredging, is the most valuable item of work, the contracting officer must give primary consideration to it.”

This decision is an important victory for the small business dredging industry because it makes it clear that federal agencies are not free to circumvent the protection afforded to small business dredging contractors, under the exception to NAICS code 237990, by characterizing work generally as civil construction even though the dominant item of work is dredging. The exception is designed to prevent brokering by non-dredging small business concerns who, after receiving an award, could subcontract virtually all of the dredging work to a large business dredging concern.

Michael H. Payne is the Chairman of the firm’s Federal Practice Group and, together with other experienced members of the group, frequently advises contractors on federal contracting matters including bid protests, claims and appeals, procurement issues, small business issues, and dispute resolution.

Robert Ruggieri is a Senior Associate in the firm’s Federal Practice Group.