As the economic crisis caused by COVID-19 evolves and worsens, there are many novel questions that government contractors and government agencies face. Certain FAR clauses that limit a contractor’s right to recover damages need to be revisited, including the clause entitled “Default (Fixed-Price Construction)” found at FAR 52.249-10. Under this clause, delay resulting from an Act of God, such as an epidemic, is excusable, but it is also non-compensable. This holds out the very real possibility of significant financial harm to construction contractors and seems to run counter to the government’s objective of preserving companies so that there will be an economic recovery once the crisis is over.

Currently, Department of Defense agencies are making every effort to treat projects as essential to the national defense and contractors are permitted, and in some cases directed, to continue performance. Since the government wants projects to continue, and government contractors want to keep working, there appears to be a commonality of interest. Contractor employees, however, are increasingly concerned about their personal health and safety and, in some cases, are refusing to report for work. This is compounded by the Permits and Responsibilities clause (FAR 52.236.7), which requires contractors to comply with “State, and municipal laws, codes, and regulations applicable to the performance of the work.” Accordingly, even though the federal government requires work to continue, state and local governments may be requiring people to maintain social distancing and stay at home. Even if exemptions are granted for government contractors working on essential projects, that does not lessen the legitimate concern of workers who are fearful of health risks.
Continue Reading Delays Resulting From Coronavirus May Be Both Excusable and Compensable

On December 3, 2018, the Department of Defense (DoD) issued a deviation from the FAR’s self-performance requirements, which applies to subcontracting limitations on contracts set aside for small businesses. Although the changes to subcontracting limitations were mandated by the 2013 National Defense Authorization Act (yes, 2013), implementation has been slow and piecemeal. The Small Business Administration (SBA) did not implement the changes until June 2016, and although the FAR Council recently issued a proposed rule that would bring the FAR into compliance, the FAR has not officially caught up. In the meantime, the discrepancy between the FAR and the SBA regulations has caused headaches for contractors who must decide whether to comply with the FAR, the SBA regulations, or both. The DoD’s deviation will bridge the gap for all DoD contracts until the FAR catches up. 
Continue Reading Department of Defense Issues FAR Deviation for Limitations on Subcontracting

Over the past couple of months, we have had several clients contact us to discuss issues involving Organizational Conflicts of Interest (OCIs). In each case, it seemed like there was some confusion either by the government, the contractor, or both, regarding what amounted to a conflict of interest and how having one could impact contract performance. In most cases, we were able to work with the contracting officer and develop a mitigation plan to avoid, neutralize, or mitigate each OCI successfully. This blog post will cover the basics about OCIs and discuss some ways that contractors can work with the government to mitigate them.

Continue Reading What is an Organizational Conflict of Interest (OCI) and How Can a Contractor Work With the Government to Mitigate One

As I mentioned in a recent post, the Department of Defense (DoD) is using its “other transaction” authority with increased frequency to attract non-traditional defense contractors and to capitalize on the cutting-edge technological advancements found in the commercial marketplace. Other Transaction Agreements (OTAs) are not procurement contracts, grants, or cooperative agreements and, as such, many procurement laws and regulations do not apply, including the Competition in Contracting Act (CICA) and the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR). 
Continue Reading Bid Protests: Are Other Transaction Agreements (OTAs) Really Bulletproof?

On March 9th, 2016, join Maria Panichelli and Amy Kirby for their two seminars, “The Fundamentals of the Far Part 1, 2 and 3,” and “Debriefings, Bid Protests and Size Status Eligibility,”as part of the Procurement Technical Assistance Center of Delaware‘s (PTAC) two part seminar event, Two Seminars on the Same Day, One Price.

For more information on these seminars, please click here.


Continue Reading Procurement Technical Assistance Center of Delaware: Two Seminars on the Same Day

Thank you for joining us for Ed DeLisle and Maria Panichelli‘s  TargetGov webinar, “REAs and CDA Claims: Key Strategies in Seeking Compensation” on February 16, 2016.

After you’ve secured your Federal government contract award, what comes next? As any Federal contractor will tell you, the contract award is only the beginning. The FAR

Please join us on NoveNVSBE logomber 18th and 19th for Maria Panichelli’s three seminars at the 2015 National Veterans Small Business Engagement in Pittsburgh, PA. To view the dates and times of Maria’s seminars, and to register, visit the NVSBE website
Continue Reading The 2015 National Veterans Small Business Engagement

In a recent decision issued by the United States Court of Federal Claims, Anthem Builders, Inc. v. United States,  April 6, 2015, WL 1546437, the Court considered a protest involving the proposed use of an individual surety to furnish required bonds.  Under FAR 28.203, an individual surety may be accepted on a federal construction

Effective today, a new Anti-Trafficking rule will substantially change and increase federal contractors’ compliance and certification requirements.  The Anti-Trafficking rule requires that all federal contractors take certain actions related to combating human trafficking and slavery in their supply and contracting chains.  Human trafficking has been a high-profile issue in government contracting in recent years, drawing

On November 25th, the DOD, GSA and NASA issued a final rule incorporating a new clause into the FAR regarding accelerated payments to small business subcontractors on Government projects. The new rule, which takes effect December 26, 2013, requires large business prime contractors receiving accelerated payments from the Government to, in turn, accelerate payments to