When an agency decides to set aside an acquisition for participation only by small businesses, certain subcontracting limitations apply to the small business awardee. For construction contracts, the small business contractor cannot pay subcontractors more than 85% of the amount they receive from the agency. For service and supply contracts, the small business contractor cannot pay more than 50% of the amount paid to it by the agency to other entities that are not similarly situated. Work performed by similarly situated entities is not considered in determining if the limitation on subcontracting is violated. A similarly situated entity is defined as a small business subcontractor that is a participant of the same small business program as the prime contractor and is small for the NAICS code assigned by the prime contractor to the subcontract.

Continue Reading Recent GAO Decision Suggests SBA Regulation Regarding Limitations on Subcontracting Takes Precedence Over the FAR

My firm is a big supporter of the National 8(a) Association and a proud sponsor of its Winter Conference, which is taking place right now in Orlando, Florida. I just left a presentation given by the SBA and several other SBA experts and found out that the SBA will finally issue its new proposed regulations governing the Mentor-Protege Program.

breaking news

The proposed regulations follow the Jobs Act of 2010 and the National Defense Authorization Act of 2013, where Congress asked the SBA to expand the Program to firms other than 8(a) companies. There has been much speculation over the last several years regarding what this overhaul would look like. Well, we’re about to find out. Here are some highlights that I learned today:

First, the SBA is going to create two distinct and different Mentor-Protege Programs, one for 8(a) companies and one for other small businesses. The one designed for other small businesses will be geared to servicing SDVOSBs, HUBZone companies, WOSBs and small businesses, generally. Mentors will still have to demonstrate good financial health, among other things, to qualify as a mentor, but there were indications during today’s presentation that the new regulations would better define the meaning of “good financial health.” For Protégés, it appears as if the proposed regulations will make it easier to qualify. If you are a participant in any of the small business programs covered by the proposed regulation, you can be a protege.

The most important aspect to the proposed rule may be the following: all companies who become Mentor and Protege through the revamped program will be able to take advantage of the exclusion from affiliation. Many speculated that this exclusion might remain with the 8(a) Mentor-Protege Program and not extend to those newly covered by the revised regulations. That does not appear to be the case. All companies will benefit from the exclusion.

There are many more changes coming as part of the proposed rules. Once they are issued on Thursday, we will share our thoughts with you.

Edward T. DeLisle is a Partner in the firm and a member of the Federal Contracting Practice Group. Ed frequently advises contractors on federal contracting matters including bid protests, claims and appeals, procurement issues, small business issues and dispute resolution.

I have been inundated with questions about the SBA’s Mentor-Protege Program over the last six to eight months. That interest is being driven by what Congress included in the National Defense Authorization Act of 2013. After failing to implement changes to the Mentor-Protege Program following the passage of the Small Business Jobs Act of 2010, the SBA was given another push in 2013. As part of the NDAA of 2013, Congress authorized the SBA to expand its Mentor-Protege Program to include companies other than those that are 8(a) certified. I understand that the SBA is actively working on regulations to make this happen and may publish something later this year. For those interested in how the program is currently constituted and what changes may be in the works, please feel free to listen to the webinar that I gave to the Associated General Contractors of America a few months ago. If you have any questions, please feel free to call me.

Edward T. DeLisle is a Partner in the firm and a member of the Federal Contracting Practice Group.