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Michael H. Payne is a Partner and Chair of the Federal Construction Group at Cohen Seglias Pallas Greenhall & Furman PC. As Chair of the firm’s growing Government Contracting Group, Michael represents contractors, subcontractors, and suppliers on a wide range of federal contracting issues, including the interpretation of solicitation and contract provisions, the filing of bid protests, resolution of disputes, and the preparation of contract claims and the litigation of appeals. Michael has vast experience in federal government contracting, stemming from his time as Chief Trial Attorney for the North Atlantic Division of the Army Corps of Engineers, and is recognized in the federal construction contracting industry as an attorney who enjoys a good working relationship with government agencies.

A contractor performed a project involving the construction of stone dike extensions and other work at four sites on the Mississippi River.  Nelson, Inc.  ASBCA No.  57201 (December 15, 2015).  One of the issues was whether the four distinct sites were separable for purposes of applying the Termination for Default clause (FAR 52.249-10).  In other words, the question was whether the contractor could be terminated for failing to diligently prosecute the work on one of the four work sites, even though the overall contract allowed 165 days for completion.  The Board stated that “Where a contract is separable (sometimes also referred to as severable, or divisible) and a contractor is delinquent only as to a separable part of the contract work, it is improper for the contracting officer to terminate for default the entire contract.”  The contractor would not be prohibited from continuing performance on any of the sites where work was being performed in a timely manner.


Continue Reading Termination for Default Held Improper

In a recent decision by the Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals, Dick Pacific Construction Co., Ltd., ASBCA No. 57675 et. al., decided on December 15, 2015, the Board repeated something that has been said many times before:

We consider daily logs to be the most reliable evidence of what actually happened during construction. Technocratica, ASBCA No. 46567 et al., 99-2 BCA ¶ 30,391 (“Daily inspection reports have been held to be prima facie evidence of the daily conditions as they existed at the time of performance.”)


Continue Reading Timely Documentation is Critical

In a post publisConstruction Sitehed in 2013, we addressed the use of termination for default as a weapon. Unfortunately, construction contractors who fall behind schedule are automatically on the defensive and they rarely find that contracting officers are willing to concede government responsibility. The government, of course, is in a difficult position when it must explain to its customer – the end-user – that the scheduled completion date will not be met. All too often, instead of admitting that the contractor is not responsible, the threat of a termination for default is held over the contractor’s head because it is easier to blame the contractor than to admit that the government made a mistake.
Continue Reading Defenses to a Termination for Default

It is not uncommon, in the litigation of a federal construction claim, for the Government to produce gigabytes of electronic data, amounting to thousands and thousands of documents, in response to a motion for the production of documents.  Frequently, these “electronic” documents are simply the scanned versions of paper files in the Government’s offices.  In the scanning process, extensive duplication occurs and documents that are clearly separate in paper file folders are scanned together in a manner that often combines multiple documents.  Once combining occurs, it is very difficult for the recipient of the electronic information to tell where one document ends and the next one begins.  Documents and their attachments become confused, are re-arranged, and difficult to follow. 
Continue Reading E-Discovery- Bring Back the Boxes

In a recent decision issued by the United States Court of Federal Claims, Anthem Builders, Inc. v. United States,  April 6, 2015, WL 1546437, the Court considered a protest involving the proposed use of an individual surety to furnish required bonds.  Under FAR 28.203, an individual surety may be accepted on a federal construction

Join partners Michael Payne and Ed DeLisle at the 2015 National 8(a) Association Winter Conference in Orlando, Florida for their presentation, “How to Effectively Team on a Federal Project.” In this discussion, Michael and Ed will explore the importance of well-crafted teaming agreements and how they are viewed by courts of various jurisdictions.

There is no question that documentation is an important part in the resolution of any construction dispute. Particularly contemporaneous documents – documents that are created at the time that events occur. Quality control reports, daily logs, and timely letters all fall into the “contemporaneous” category. Another type, however, has an instantaneous characteristic that not only

In a bid protest argued by our firm before the United States Court of Federal Claims on September 23, 2014, the Court ruled in favor of our client, RLB Contracting, Inc., (RLB) in a matter involving the designation of the dredging exception to NAICS code 237990, which is for “Other Heavy and Civil Engineering Construction.”

Federal contractors and subcontractors will soon be subject to new regulations, which increase those contractors’ obligations to hire both veterans and individuals with disabilities (“IWDs”). On March 24, 2014, two final rules promulgated by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Federal Contract Compliance Program (“OFCCP”) will go into effect. The veterans rule updates the